NEW CONSCIOUS CONSUMPTION AND BRANDING WITH PITCH STUDIOS | VISORE LAB

Conscious Consumption
And Branding With Pitch Studios

Nike’s iconic tick was supersized in shades of red. Pitch Studios is the design house behind the large scale three-dimensional animation which gave an illusion that Melbourne’s Curtin House was hovering mid-air. Air Max Day 2018 was literally taken to greater heights and the projection acted as a beacon for ships at sea but in this case, prospective consumers. The fashion industry and its subsequent events can be seen as elitist but with this project, Pitch broke that barrier by inviting the public to be immersed in the world they created.

“Experiences are what we’re fundamentally familiar with. Throughout life, we gain a variety of experiences and through each experience, we gather significant memories. By creating something immersive, a memory is literally hardwired to a human. Better yet, by allowing multiple senses to be tapped into allows for a more memorable experience” — Christie Morgan, Founder and Creative Director of Pitch Studios.

All brands want to be remembered. We agree with Pitch Studios that storytelling is the key to connection and relevancy. This is a divergence from the past mentality of placing the focal point on the benefits of a product, as noted by Morgan. Pitch Studios brings an exceptional quality into the conversation. Morgan once described it as “designist”. Having their tends in both the camps of art and design is a “somewhat uncomfortable yet transient space”. The result is a visual language that is a fluid symbiosis. Working with names from G-Star Raw to Tate Britain, Pitch Studios has their cake and eats it. 

Their latest endeavour, Pitch Portal, is just as ardent with pursuing the future. The Portal, headed by Taylor Mitchell, explores forecasting, alternative communication models and experimental art projects. One of their projects, “Mood Machine” unlocks the spectrum of sensory experience. By bringing in an audio element, the viewer is not just mesmerized by ethereal visuals but feelings are invoked. Just like that, a digital experience is humanised. At the core of Pitch is the underlying philosophy of leaving a lasting memory — a digital sandman reverie — in every project they dip their creative hands in.

– What did you mean when you said “art drives taste and taste drives consumption”?

Christie: It’s a comment on the cyclical process of consumption. Artists, operating inside their own subculture and community, are often the ones who “set the trends” or build taste. And from this taste, trends are often pushed back into the mainstream population who are typically the ones consuming.

 – What did you mean when you said “art drives taste and taste drives consumption”?

Christie: It’s a comment on the cyclical process of consumption. Artists, operating inside their own subculture and community, are often the ones who “set the trends” or build taste. And from this taste, trends are often pushed back into the mainstream population who are typically the ones consuming.

– Going from a tangible publication to a design studio where viewers view Pitch’s work digitally, what are the differences between solely interating digitally and then seeing digital works in physical spaces? 

Christie: Physical spaces are something we can’t ignore. Our world today is filled with this extremely blurred line between the physical and digital. It’s becoming more and more fused. For me, the main difference is that physical work generally holds more of an impact emotionally. Memories created are stronger and longer lasting. It’s designed to tap into physical sensations. Digital work can tap into that too but we’re so used to looking at art and design through a screen that taking a step out of our digital comfort zone encourages a more human experience.

– What are some implications of brands communicating through a digital screen? 

Taylor: There’s a limitless level of intimate engagement that brands have with individuals through their screen, at all moments of their lives including the fragile ones. I think we need to remember this when creating content, and think about the sort of moments that this content will, however slightly, be part of. 

– How do you think that affects consumption?

Christie: It pushes the audience to genuinely reconsider the brands they engage in on a daily basis. If, perhaps a certain piece of content is triggering or fundamentally flawed, they’ll stray away from engaging and/or tinker with visibility of said brand. 

– Given the research done at Pitch Portal with conscious consumption. What is the future of emotional value perceptions in an industry like fashion? 

Taylor: Given the attitudes shaped by climate change and digital culture, we believe there will be a need for more emotional attachment to the tactile objects in our lives. Fashion will continue to draw more on cultural context and emotive drivers like nostalgia to stay relevant, and brands will feel more pressure to place themselves in cultural and political contexts. 

– What are the pros and cons of a brand engaging in social and political issues? 

Taylor: The pros are that commercial storytelling plays a major role in shaping new normals, which may then play a role in informing new policies or creating long-term, positive societal changes. The con however is that brands often do a great job of simplifying contentious issues when they adopt them into their brand or marketing strategy. For example, often a brand’s ‘’social change” strategy may focus on a cause completely removed from their production line, or from improving the situations of the stakeholders and communities they may be benefiting from.

Share This